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20121202
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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
movement, the civil rights movement, and, you know, things were happening, boys and girls. harvey's election i think made people take notice. i think that george's, george's proclivities were always in and around social justice. i know that he was raised catholic. so was i. 16 years of catholic school has made me the man i am today. [laughter] >> and harvey influenced by jewish culture, you know, i don't think it's ever been explored enough. but if you talk to every brit, you know that harvey was a very, very much impacted by the holocaust. you know, if you remember, it happened in the '40s. it's only 20 years or so since he came onto the scene. and i think he was able to transfer, you know, that tragedy and that oppression into what was happening with gay people. he was very scrappy. i wanted to acknowledge two people who were very supportive of harvey milk and george moscone, and both of them have left us and that's howard wallace and hank wilson. (applause) >> what i loved about them was, what i loved about them was they knocked back a few and really get into it with harvey abo
rights, though that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, that is what's so speci
and civil rights attorney. i got to understand how much of a be in san francisco is to the rest of the world for social justice. i spent a number of years helping to grow a small business. i got to understand the innovative spirit in san francisco. at night, i volunteered as a neighborhood leader and as feature of an affordable housing organization. i learned so much about the challenges facing our neighborhoods and the special jewels that are the urban villages we live in. i ran for office because i wanted to serve the city and protect all that is so special about san francisco. >> what lessons did you learn after campaigning for supervisor? >> san franciscans are incredibly interested in their city government, local politics, and making sure that we remain the most amazing city in the world. i learned that san franciscans during campaign read everything they are sent in the mail. they love to meet the candidates and engage in conversations with them. i learned how important it is to build bridges between different communities, particularly communities of diversity that we have. i was incre
's current president jacob zuma, who met with the civil rights icon this morning. mandela was admitted to a hospital for testing. this is video from his 94th birthday earlier this year. few additional details about his condition are available. worshippers concerned about mandela have gathered at a johannesburg church. which has been a center for anti- apartheid protests. >> there are plenty of holiday-themed events happening around the bay today. here are just a few. it's snow day in berkeley's gourmet ghetto. starting at 10 a.m. parents can take their kids to visit the snow queen and work on craft projects. that's free, at 16 - 73 shattuck avenue in berkeley. >> then at 4 p.m. festivities begin down in santa clara's great america amusement park. this weekend is chinese and hispanic cultures weekend. santa will be there, along with dancers, magicians, a laser light show and more. also in the south bay, an event for the second night of hanukkah the jewish community center of silicon valley is hosting a menorah lighting. that's at 4 p.m. at the santana row shopping center on olin avenue.
you for the support. although we're finding out in this city a lot of people civic and civil rights are being cut back on. we hope you, the board of supervisors, will be like the board of supervisors who brought forth the medical marijuana that now 25 states enjoy. supervisors to create codes and sros will be coming here december 4. you know sros, you talk about domestic violence, you talk about homophobia, racism. it's inside now. people want to get up from the sheets and run to the street, whether they naked or not. you know the naked truth is that we really want you guys to do what chris daly did. he's the only one that built apartments on the corner of bank burger king. the united states two weeks ago we voted for the president. two weeks today. they emo he that the -- know the united states politicians are working three days a week and no times for the citizens. we don't want you to reflect that. i want to remember you board of supervisors. when ross was the supervisor here you only making 33,000. we voted that youz/( -w would me over 115 so that you could do the work -- to san
and now a judge needs to sign off on this last- minute deal with civil rights attorneys. instead, they agreed to a compliance director appointed by a judge and paid for by the city. cbs 5 insider phil matier says both sides can claim a partial victory now. >> the plaintiffs will now have someone within the department answerable to the court to make sure that changes are made. most importantly, what they avoid is a complete federal takeover something that would be an embarrassment for the city and could lead it a judge telling them they don't have enough cops and ordering them to hire more. >> according to the "oakland tribune" this makes oakland the first city in the nation to have its police command staff under the authority of a court- appointed director. >>> hundreds of people showed up to talk about crime at an oakland town hall meeting. mayor quan admitted oakland is seeing more violent crime, specifically robberies. police officials talked about programs they are using to fight crime. but a gunfight in the same neighborhood the previous night did not come up at the meeting.
, whether that's being on the wrong side of slavery, being on the wrong side of civil rights movement. being on the wrong side of giving women the right to vote. being on the wrong side of interracial marriage. at the end of the day, america is moving towards giving gay and lesbians, gay and lesbian americans the same rights to marry that all americans enjoy. and that is where the country is heading. that is a bow that cannot be untied no matter what the republican party does. >> mckay, it looks like the mormon church might also be moving at this point. they've got this new website out, sort of explaining a little more in detail their view on gay marriage and really urging a tremendous amount of tolerance, i think. what are your thoughts on that? >> yeah, this new website is mormons and gays.org. and it represents a pretty significant effort to reach out to gay mormons in particular and the broader gay community. you remember in 2008, the mormon church urged its members to get heavily involved in passing proposition 8, which banned gay marriage in california. and ever since then, the relatio
in to the presidency. later, brooks helped author the 1964 civil rights act, and he drafted the articles of impeachment against president nixon. jack brooks was 89 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: lawmakers stepped up the rhetoric, but grew no closer today to agreement on how to avoid slipping over the so- called fiscal cliff. but each side demanded the other compromise. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> i have to just tell you that is a... that is a bad strategy for america, it's a bad strategy for your businesses, and it is not a game that i will play. >> reporter: president obama today, in washington, assured business executives he'll reject attempts to link the fiscal cliff budget negotiations to future increases in the nation's debt ceiling. "the new york times" reported republicans might accept higher tax rates on wealthier americans to avoid triggering tax hikes for everyone. in return, they'd demand greater spending cuts next year before raising the federal borrowing limit. >> if congress in any way sugg
is the thing, if you are gay and alive in our time in america, we're living in a kind of a policy and civil rights renaissance. we have seen extraordinary leadership from other parts of government already. don't we judge, chris, presidents by whether they stand up to the moment of history in which they live? we have seen president obama step up to this issue, gay marriage -- sgroo getting rid of don't ask, don't tell. now saying he won't endorse doma. >> and our military has stepped up. >> even the marines are doing a great job. >> even the marines are. now we have to see will the supreme court also keep pace in our time with the other major institutions. >> count me as an optimist here. i know there were questions. chad, you're the expert, i have supported it and my wife has for years, human rights campaign. you have a hell of a name, human rights campaign. it's a great name. the liberty clause. if you get to the idea of 14th amendment. life, liberty, and property cannot be denied to you. you have to do something wrong. it's got to be a crime. you can't just be denied liberty. your thought
with you. >> my ministry, went through the civil rights movement, as you know. went to college and got a b.s. degree, first in my family, then a masters degree. then i worked three years at university tennessee. only black people out of 3,000 national scientists. that was a good experience for me. i came to washington in 1965 to head the student-run -- >> before the district had home rule or anything like that. >> so for 31 years, from school board to counsel at large, four terms as a mayor, another fourth term -- >> just re-elected. >> just re-elected. 16 years of mayor, it's a long time before anybody will come close to it. it's good if you do two terms, as you know, kennedy one term, and that's a trend now. this job is a different kind of job now. when i was in it, we had more resources. there's no textbook on being mayor so i learned the hard way by doing. i have been very, very successful in a whole bunch of programs. if you're going to look -- >> tell people about this. in 1980s. >> it was a sleepy, southern town with two or three-story buildings all over, including k street downtown
with disabilities act, and what it has done to our society. like our civil rights act. what it's done to break down the barriers and to show that people with disabilities can contribute to society, if only given the chance and the opportunity. i would think that we would want for them to then say yes, we'll be a part of a worldwide effort to break down those barriers against people with disabilities we want be part of a worldwide effort that says it's not right, it's not okay, to leave a baby on the side of the road to die simply because that baby has down syndrome. you would think we would want to be part of an effort, a global effort that says it's not all right to keep kids out of school and away from education because they have a physical disability, they use a wheelchair. or an intellectual disability. you would think we would want to be part of an effort like that that says it is not okay to put people in cells, chained to cells, whose only crime is that they are disabled. you would think we would want to be part of that effort. we've done that in this country. we've done wonderful things. an
worried about president morici sweeping it. that is more what the protests are about right now. ashley: what is the biggest danger, that this just dissolves into full-blown civil unrest? >> well, i think, even a bigger danger is the creeping of egyptian society. people are quite worried about it at this moment. it will actually prevent voters being informed on what is and isn't. ashley: expansion of powers for president morsi, kind of just voted himself into this position. is there anything that can be done about this? >> what the muslim brotherhood claims is that the last year and a half has been bad for society and bad for the economy. they need to get to this transition phase. get the constitution approved and get the country back to business. there are a lot of egyptian, so little social trust there right now. people are really fearful right now. ashley: this puts the u.s. in a bit of a difficult situation. there is a lot of money that comes to the united states to help the egyptian military. here we are, again, what does the u.s. do in this situation? it has to be a concern. >> ab
, that the magnitsky act remain focused scairl and exclusively on russia. that's what russian democrats and civil society groups tell me they want right now. they want congress to send their government a message on human rights and by keeping the magnitsky act focused for now on russia we can do just that. furthermore, the administration can use its own executive authority at this time to apply similar kinds of pressures contained in the magnitsky act to human rights abusers in other countries. i for one will be watching closely to see if they do. for in many other cases are crying out for greater u.s. leadership on behalf of human rights. and if the administration does not take the initiative to apply the leverage at our disposal to these other cases beyond russia, that is the surest way to ensure that the congress will act to globalize the enact next year. there are still many people who look at the magnitsky act as anti--russia. i disagree. i believe it's pro-russia. believe it's pro-russia because this legislation is about the rule of law, and human rights, and accountability which are values
constitution. the fact is that our constitution has been amended 17 times and always to expand rights and never to narrow them except prohibition that got repealed. what's the truth is that this is an issue that has taken hold. it's about civil marriage licenses. there's just been too many people that have now come out and, you know, thousands and millions of individual acts where the american public something the strategists did not anticipate back in 1996 is the american public shifts and as it has become comfortable, they have determined yes, these licenses should be extended. you know, the u.s. supreme court could determine this on narrower grounds, just on the california issue and just strike down doma. then we are left with nine states where you can marry and it would remain unresolved as to the other states. seasoning correct. >> if we are ever going to see civil marriage in alabama, it has to be the u.s. supreme court. i think we are living in an amazing era for gay people. hopefully the supreme court will understand its moment in history and like it has done before, come down on the si
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)